The making of a beaver dam
When the beaver creates this amazing feature it also create an ecosystem that allow other wild life to flourish.
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Why Beaver Dams?

   We have found many Indian artifacts on a sandy hill next to the park. 2 seperate archaeologist evamined the artifacts and told us that this land has been continually inhabited for approximately 10 thousand years. This intrigued me, as the land was harsh and brushy, and I wondered what was the appeal.  Then I came across "The Watershed Wisdom of the Beaver" written by Toby Hemenway and it all became clear.
 From topo maps I can see where the beavers would have built a dam creating a several acre lake below the Indian camp hill. On both sides of the hill are creeks, which the beavers would dam, creating a series of stair stepped series of ponds. So to the east, below the hill the sun would rise every morning over beautiful lake, and on the sides of the hill were terraced pools, surrounded by marshes and meadows, teeming with life and food. A virtual Eden! 
 We salvaged many artifacts ahead of development, and intend on displaying them in a Nature Center that is planned on the property in the future . Among these artifacts are many hinges from enormous freshwater clam shells. The thin shells have disappeared but the thicker hinges remained. The nearest river is the San Jacinto, several miles away, and I wondered about the hinges provenance but now I believe they were collected much closer.
Since I read Toby's article we have begun trying to attract the Beavers back by creating habitat, which is mainly pond building and Willow planting, and it has worked! We now have several small beaver dams on Town Creek, and a small lodge in the canal.
     The beavers are elusive, and we only catch glimpses of them on our game cam, but their work is evidence enough of thier return. The ponds are deep, supporting fish and clam populations. On our cameras we have pictures of many animals using the dams to cross the creek, including deer, racoons, coyotes, herons, egrets, bobcats, possums, even an armadillo! I guess the only critter we havent seen crossing the dam is a skunk. Town Creek Park will ensure the beavers and thier nieghbors retain thier niche here forever.

      You can read Toby Hemenway's article here: http://tobyhemenway.com/150-the-watershed-wisdom-of-the-beaver/